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With the UK coming out of lockdown companies are starting to look at some of the vacancies that they may have put on hold to start recruiting new staff. You may be asking yourself - What are typical recruitment costs that I can expect to pay? What options do I have for recruitment? 
 
Whilst there are fluctuations across different industries, typical recruitment costs are between 15 – 20% of your new employee's basic take on salary, if you use a recruitment consultancy or a recruitment agency to recruit. This is usually payable once the candidate has started their new role. There are no upfront costs, and therefore the risks are low – it is the standard “no win, no fee” model. For this, the agency will have looked at their pool of candidates and given you access to the ones that they think are most suitable to the position for which you are recruiting. They will sell the opportunity to the candidates on your behalf and they will also liaise between you and the candidate for booking interviews and should make sure that the candidate is fully briefed before an interview.  
 
If you take someone on, the costs to you are relatively high – and one of the reasons for this is that recruiters know that they won’t fill all of the roles that they are working on. They charge more to those companies that they do place people with as they are not making any money from those that don’t take their candidates on. 
 
What about other options? 
Your business is growing, you have started to employ staff, but how do you ensure that everyone is working together for the good of your business. There are six steps that you need to follow when creating a strong team. I am delighted to share with you the thoughts of Kathy Bassett from Action Coach who explains the six ways to build a winning team. 
 
1) Focus on Strong Leadership 
 
– Having strong leaders within your business is vital, whether it is just you or your management team. You need to be someone who communicates well and who everyone trusts. As a leader you will inspire others to go that extra mile. Businesses that have strong leadership display the following behaviours. Solving problems effectively. Operating with a strong results orientation. Seeking different perspectives. Supporting others 
 
2) Set Common Goals  
 
- You need to ensure that you have a Common Goal. Your team need to have a clear understanding of the direction that your business is heading in, what the goals are for the next month, quarter and year. Most importantly of all, they need to understand their role in the process and how they can help you achieve it. 
 
 
Over the last 12 months, we have seen recruitment do a full U-turn. At the start of the year, there were lots of vacancies and very few candidates. Candidates were “king”. They may have had several offers on the table to consider and companies were having to work hard to “woo” them. As we leave behind 2020 the market is flooded with candidates, some of them have been out of the workforce for the best part of a year as a result of the furlough scheme. Most of them are keen to secure a new position and have lots of skills and experience. They are now finding themselves in a busy marketplace where competition for each role is hard and companies suddenly have the pick of the best candidates. So, what does 2021 look like for a company looking to recruit? 
 
What do we think the top 5 trends are likely to be in 2021? 
You are probably planning for 2021 now. It is also a great time to start planning your recruitment for next year. If you haven’t ever done a workforce planning exercise for the year ahead, read on as to why you should and how to go about it. (and it’ll make your life a lot easier!) 
 
 
 
By looking at your workforce needs over the next 12 months, means that you can plan your recruitment in a more proactive, rather than a reactive way. If you know what your business plans are for the next twelve months then you can plan to recruit the right people to help you deliver your short and long-term organisational goals. 
 
So what 4 points should you consider? 
 
Start by assessing your current situation and reviewing your current workforce. Who do you currently have that aren’t quite at the level that you require them to be? Regularly, when working with clients, I hear managers talking about people who they know are looking for their next role, or are under internal performance measures. What is the likelihood that you are going to lose these people in the next 12 months? Put these expected vacancies into the plan. 
 
Up until March 2020 recruitment was taking place in a candidate-driven market, and this had been the way for at least 2 years. This meant that there were very few great candidates compared to the number of roles out there. Candidates were in the driving seat. A great candidate was in a position to be able to negotiate on salary, dictate when they were available for interview and keep employers waiting whilst they considered the best offer for them. 
Then COVID happened and other strange things started to happen to recruitment too. Firstly, potential candidates who were furloughed, or were no longer confident in the longer-term prospects of their company started to look for their next position. Secondly, huge numbers of vacancies were put on hold as employers started to try and guess their marketplaces and the long-term impact of COVID. Companies that were recruiting found that the numbers of applications started to increase rapidly. 
 
Finally, we have settled into a new norm (well for the time being at least!) where those companies that may have stalled for a while have pivoted within their market place and those that are growing need to fill their vacancies. However, the candidate pool is now huge and will continue to grow over 2021. 
 
So, what does this mean to you if you are recruiting? 
 
With the latest announcement from the government and stricter lockdown rules being put in place, for what looks like could be quite a long time, you may be thinking about putting your recruitment on hold, how can you possibly do a successful recruitment drive during a pandemic? Well we think you can and we also think we can help you do it well. 
 
After a slow and difficult year in recruitment, the pace has changed, it is now quick and rapid. There are lots of great candidates out there – if you are looking for a Business-Critical role look sooner rather than later, the candidates at the moment are proactive – not reactive. At Emerald Starfish we can help you push on with your recruitment needs, we have everything in place to help you fully recruit remotely without coming in to contact with anyone face to face, therefore keeping the risks to a minimum for all involved. Here is how we can do this, all the while ensuring the candidates are right for you and your company. 
 
 
When we set up Emerald Starfish over 10 years ago, we wanted to do recruitment differently. We loved recruitment and making a difference for our candidates as well as our clients. Getting candidates on the next step on their career ladder, an increased salary and a new opportunity to learn new skills. 
 
 
 
We felt that there was a mismatch though, working in a recruitment agency we were working for the candidates – trying to get them the best salary, selling them in against other candidates, but the client was paying the bill. 
 
At Emerald Starfish we wanted to bring the focus to the client – to understand what they need for their next position, and to make sure that all of their time wasn’t taken up testing and assessing candidates and paying us for the pleasure! 
 
 
 
 
Whilst there is a lot of turbulence in the current employment market – and over half of employees expect to be made redundant it is still a difficult message to deliver. How can you support your managers around delivering redundancy and restructuring news? 
 
 
 
Often the main concerns are not so much around the message itself but more the thought of delivering the news. Whilst the current climate means that most people are clear as to reasons why a company may be considering restructuring or redundancy they can still be emotive conversations that are open to misinterpretation or hostile feelings. 
 
 
What three things can you do to support your managers during this time? 
 
 
 
 
With many employees furloughed, and as the furlough scheme changes are you using this opportunity to right-size your company and consider redundancies? 
 
Rightsizing is a proactive activity and should be a constant part of managing an organisation. By adjusting an organisation like this can make it the most efficient, effective, competitive and profitable that it can be. 
 
20% of companies are planning redundancies this summer despite the furlough scheme and over half of employees are worried about losing their job. 
 
Three key questions to ask before you start assessing your workforce are: 
1. In what way post-pandemic will your customer needs have changed? 
2. What will success for your business look like going forward? 
3. What positives changes from remote/social distancing working can you introduce to the workplace following lockdown? 
 
Next, look at where you are now and what talent do you have within, what areas you may need to upskill or what new skills should you be looking to bring into the organisation. 
 
Look first to your business-critical positions which will help with the long-term success of the business. All the furloughed employees –can you manage without any of them? Identify your high potential employees – these are the ones who embrace and embody the culture of the organisation, can flex and adapt and perform at a high level in their current positions. 
As the old way of working has now gone and we are all trying to embrace the new norm companies are returning to the workplace with risk assessments in place, social distancing to be adhered to and decisions on how to bring staff safely back to work. What challenges will you face on bringing people back from furlough? 
1. Communication 
 
Make sure your communication is clear. Some people who were furloughed from the outset have been off work for 3 months and for them time in the work place has stood. They may expect to return to exactly the same way of working as pre-lockdown and will certainly not understand exactly how the business and your way of working may have changed. Take time to explain what “business as usual” now looks like the changes that have been implemented and why these changes have happened. A clear redefinition of their role responsibilities will also help them to understand “now” as well as focussing on health & safety and any new policies and procedures you may have introduced. 
 

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